Archive for March, 2009

Quizzes, weddings & fancy men's shoes

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

Today we launched a new application at Pure Incubation. It’s an assessment/quiz tool. The application allows us to create multi-page quizzes or assessments with a wide range of question types, point values and responses, and then build results based on the answers that were given by the person taking the test. It’s exciting to launch something new, and I can’t wait to start publishing quizzes, assessments and Websites in a whole range of markets to take advantage of the application’s capabilities.

Like I said, the app launched today and the first quiz is out – What Style Wedding Gown is Right for You? Although this quiz will clearly be the most useful for anyone planning a wedding (and I hope that you’ll forward the link to any bride-to-be that you know), I would love for anyone vigrx reviews reading this post to take the quiz and send me feedback. You can find my contact details here or post your comments to the bottom of this post. Seriously – I want to know what you think about the whole thing, specifically the application, but also about the content of the quiz. All comments, both positive and negative, are welcome.

Since I’m talking about the wedding Websites, here’s one more random bit. On the March 12 episode of The Office, Michael Scott (the show’s “hero”) is talking about a business idea that he has planned. Although his imaginary company is called “shoe-la-la,” I couldn’t help but find it humorous that I actually HAVE a site called Shoella. The names are eerily similar. Here’s the clip – enjoy.

And please send me your comments and feedback!

One problem with Internet publishing

Monday, March 16th, 2009

I am a huge proponent of Internet publishing – obviously. I’ve built an entire business around creating online media sites and supporting publishing companies with software that facilitates and improves the publishing process. But there is a problem with Internet publishing that many people have referenced in the past, but came to light for me last week with a first-hand experience.

left sign pointing rightI was working on an article for The Industry StandardWhen will BlackBerry App World launch? And I found a lot of reports from various media organizations, including Gizmodo, that the App World store was set to launch on March 4. It didn’t. So then I was looking everywhere for the reports that the store launch was delayed, trying to find out what happened to RIM to delay the launch.

But I didn’t find any stories about the App World delays.

So that oddity caused me to send a quick note off to a BlackBerry PR rep to ask her about the March 4 launch date. Her response:

“RIM announced the official name of the application storefront – BlackBerry App World – on March 4th. The company did not set March 4th as a launch date. I did see some articles that mistakenly said the store was announced on the 4th, but that was just the date the official name was released xanax bars (the storefront was actually first announced in fall 2008). BlackBerry App World is on track to launch within the next month.”

I sent the note and heard back from the rep about 1.5 hours later. Easy. But this experience brought home the point that Fred Wilson made on March 4 (ironically) about talking to the source to get a story right. It is so easy to send a quick note to a company or an individual to check on the facts of a story before publishing, but it’s easier to NOT send that note. Trust me – I’m as guilty of this as the next guy. I just happened to notice a discrepancy when I was researching the story; otherwise it’s doubtful that I would have sent that note to the PR rep at all.

This is definitely a problem with online publishing. Not that one publication could make a mistake – that happens in print publishing, too. But that one publication makes a mistake, which is then picked up over, and over, and over again by various online media outlets without anyone ever checking the facts.

The solution to this problem is the readers. It will be up to all of us to determine the reliable publications, and support them by reading the ones that are good, and not the others.

Photo by srslyguy

Geek star + reality TV = iPhone innovation

Monday, March 9th, 2009

My lastest article was just posted to The Industry Standard: Woz: “Dancing with the Stars” victory possible with geek support.

Woz dancing with the starsYes, that’s right – Steve Wozniak (aka The Woz) is one of the contestents on this season’s Dancing with the Stars, which debuts tonight. I am rooting for him, although after watching the video embeded below, I’m not holding out a lot of hope that he’s going to crack the top 10. But GO GET ‘EM WOZ!!! It takes a whole lot more guts than I have to go on television in front of 20+ million people dancing. Seriously, that is some brave stuff. I saw video of myself dancing at my wedding. Not. Pretty. Semenax

There is one thing that I think might get missed in all the stories about Woz’s efforts to dominate the dance floor that is worth mentioning. That one thing comes from a letter that was posted to his personal Website.

“An iPhone app to vote for me should be in the iTunes store soon but it’s not there yet.”

As far as I can tell, this is the first time that a reality TV contestant has launched an iPhone application to help fans cast votes for him. But it won’t be the last.

Leave it to The Woz to innovate in a format that no one thought could ever be improved upon – Reality TV.

A Verizon iPhone is not happening in 2009

Thursday, March 5th, 2009

At least, I don’t think so! Read why in my latest article in The Industry Standard: A Verizon iPhone in 2009? Not likely.

(And sorry for the lack of recent posts! I am hoping to get back to writing more regularly VERY SOON.)